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11 January 2016

Another New Year: What do Djibouti citizens rarely have on their festive tables?

Liban Kamil Yassin, TPU student came to Tomsk from Djibouti, a small country of East Africa. Now Kamil Yassin is studying the Russian language at Pre-University Department, IIE&LC. He told the News Service about New Year’s Eve celebration in his country where the average temperature in the coldest month is + 26. It was the first time when Liban Kamil Yassin had ever seen snow.

“I had been waiting for snow from the very first moment upon my arrival. I was impressed. But now it is usual to see white trees and roads”, said Kamil Yassin.

Festive illumination, decorated buildings and preholiday vanity delighted Kamil’s eyes.

“We also celebrate New Year’s Eve on December 31st but we don’t decorate anything. It’s a holiday of giving presents to friends and relatives, we lay festive table with meat and milk”, commented he.

Djibouti is a Muslim country; therefore, the beginning of the year according to Islamic calendar is celebrated more extensively. Every year the celebration is held on different days because Islamic year is based on the lunar calendar.

“The Muslim New Year’s Eve is a family holiday. We visit our relatives, dress up in new clothes and give money to children for good luck. People cook much festive meals. We always have meat with sweet dressing and cheese”.

There are no variants for Santa Claus or Father Frost in Djibouti. Instead, people go to villages to spiritual people who can pray for others at the request.

Now Liban is looking forward to New Year’s Eve. It’s of great interest for him how Siberian people celebrate this holiday. Though Yassin has just started to study the Russian Language, he is very good at pronouncing the word “cake”.

“I wish myself good studying in Russia on New Year’s Eve. I want to come back to Djibouti with prestige education and come up in the world”, said Yassin.

The information was taken from the website: http://tpu.ru/en/news-events/709/


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